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cumberpatchmannor:
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rvsa:

gotta knock a little harder

Fuuuuuuuuck I love this show and also rvsa

rvsa:

gotta knock a little harder

Fuuuuuuuuck I love this show and also rvsa

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coelasquid:

hielario replied to your post: Maybe Mike Tyson has something to do w…

What’s the connection between Tyson and pigeons? I don’t get it.

He’s taken care of pigeons his entire life, his first fight ever was when he was a little kid and a bigger kid killed one of his pigeons, when he retired…

MIKE TYSON LOVES PIGEONS DID YOU KNOW

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I made this dumb comic!

I made this dumb comic!

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wapiti3:

Denmark birds described / By Kjaerbølling, N. (Niels), 1806-1871 on Flickr.

Publication info Copenhagen: Author Publisher 0.1851 to 1852.
BHL Collections:
Smithsonian Libraries

Reblogging as tattoo ideas

(via scientificillustration)

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good evening internet enjoy this little Freaks and Geeks era Seth Rogan 

good evening internet enjoy this little Freaks and Geeks era Seth Rogan 

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wapiti3:

Physical and political history of Chile according to documents acquired in this republic for twelve years of residence there and published under the auspices of the supreme government on Flickr.

By Gay, Claudio, 1800-1873 
Publication info Paris, Home of the author, 1844-1871.
Contributing Library:
Research Library, The Getty Research Institute
BioDiv. Library

(via scientificillustration)

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pogosticks:

Schizophyllum by Steve Axford
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After ruthioniformes did her house seal, I had to too. Made in Magna Studio on my new Surface! House Twarogowski, of the Island. Three coffee beans beside a waxing red moon, beside a hen’s head. "Hac enum opus est, ut quod hernesto die""Tonight we work, to repair yesterday"

After ruthioniformes did her house seal, I had to too. Made in Magna Studio on my new Surface! 
House Twarogowski, of the Island. 
Three coffee beans beside a waxing red moon, beside a hen’s head. 
"Hac enum opus est, ut quod hernesto die"
"Tonight we work, to repair yesterday"

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ruthioniformes:

jtotheizzoe:

Doodling the Right Thing

With a few humble doodles, I think Google may have created the most widely-seen, and perhaps the most influential, science communication effort on Earth. Their series of Google search page tributes to female scientists (a few of which I’ve shared above) is a huge win for showcasing the efforts of women in science, which, unless you’ve been living under a very patriarchal rock for the past forever, you know is something the world needs very badly. 

It might seem silly to be talking about a picture like this, but we’re dealing with the Times Square billboard of internet graphics here. Every day, 730 million people visit Google.com a total of 17 billion times. Billion. Granted, not all of them see the same Google doodle, as only a small set of them are “global” doodles, but even if just 10% of daily unique visitors see a particular doodle, and just 10% of those people take the time to figure out who/what they’re looking at, that means 7+ million people a day (and that doesn’t even take into account repeated visits). I suspect that’s a low estimate, too, although I base that on nothing except my own optimism.

For comparison, Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey drew just over 3 million U.S. viewers for its final episode. I’ll concede that’s not really a fair comparison, since Cosmos is a highly-produced, hour-long scripted TV series with very broad and lofty goals and a Google doodle is, well, a picture on the internet. The point I’m trying to make is not that Cosmos is less influential than a cartoon, because that’s ridiculous (although I must admit the more I think about it, I really don’t know how ridiculous it is). My point is that a Google doodle about science reaches a metric f**kton of people.

I am having a hard time thinking of another single Internet Thing that has the potential to reach so many people in a single day. No meme-filled Facebook page or educational YouTube channel comes close, and I don’t suspect any traditional science news/media sites are even in the ballpark. 

Google still has a long way to go to bring their doodle gender representation anywhere close to level. According to SPARK, only 17% of doodles between 2001-2013 were women (and 74% of them were white people). In addition to monitoring women featured in doodles, the blog Speaking Up For Us keeps a running list of doodle-worthy women.Despite that remaining imbalance, I think this is an incredible effort on the part of Google, and we should demand even more doodles of underrepresented groups (both in science and beyond).

Can something so passive make any difference? To be honest, I don’t know, but I suspect that it does. When people only see one type of person recognized for accomplishing the Great Scientific Things of history, they consciously and subconsciously assume that only that type of person actually accomplishes Great Scientific Things. That is how underrepresented people stay underrepresented, which is the opposite thing we want to happen.

Google doodles aren’t going to cure cancer or send a human to Mars, but they just might help inspire the person who does. Not bad for a drawing.

I wonder what the percentage of female google doodles is more recently. It seems like more and more have been ladies recently (I especially loved the Rachel Carson doodle). I randomly met a google employee at a BBQ a couple weeks ago who worked next to the doodle crew and she mentioned that this trend I’ve noticed is something the team purposefully doing. Hooray for ladies in science!

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design-is-fine:

Eric Gill, Gill Sans ’g’, 1933. St. Pride Printing Library, London. Source 

design-is-fine:

Eric Gill, Gill Sans ’g’, 1933. St. Pride Printing Library, London. Source 

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thosedamnedbees:

deerhoof:

the future is here and it’s horrible

May robots always be fuckups

At least one of these will ALWAYS make me laugh

(Source: pierregrassou, via machinery)

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design-is-fine:

Futura Specimen Booklet, 1930s. From Bauer Alphabets Inc., USA. Via Herb Lubalin Study Center